Performance and simplicity keys to new X7 3D Laser Scanning System

Trimble’s new X7 will put 3D laser scanning into the hands of professionals regardless of their level of expertise.

Announced at the massive Intergeo expo in Germany, Trimble’s new X7 3D laser scanning system is a game changer across many industries, delivering the ability to quickly and easily capture precise 3D scanning data to produce high-quality deliverables.

Ideal for surveying, construction, industrial and forensic applications, the Trimble X7 3D laser scanner is an integrated solution with specialised field software, featuring:

  • Simple and streamlined workflows to provide automatic registration of point cloud data in the field with Trimble Registration Assist
  • Smart Trimble X-Drive technology to eliminate the need for annual calibration
  • Survey-grade self-levelling to ensure consistent data quality
  • Professional quality and sturdy IP55 rating backed by an industry leading two-year warranty
  • The compact and reliable laser scanner comes with a Microsoft Windows-based Trimble T10 ruggedized tablet for control and project visibility, along with a backpack and lightweight tripod for portability.

“The Trimble X7 delivers high-speed 3D laser scanning with intuitive workflows and unique technologies automating critical steps, which improves efficiency and productivity,” Gregory Lepere, marketing director, optical and imaging for Trimble Geospatial, said.

“The X7 is a useful, everyday tool because it doesn't require scanning expertise to operate.

“It opens the door for more construction, surveying, industrial and forensics professionals to confidently capture and deliver scan data and realize a faster return on investment."

Surveying

For surveyors and geospatial professionals, the X7 provides fast and balanced performance in indoor and outdoor environments and is ideal for industrial survey/tank calibration, civil infrastructure, general surveys, road intersection surveys, utilities, mining and historical documentation and renovation.

The Trimble X7 solution is fully integrated with the new Trimble Perspective software specifically designed for in-field control and complete registration. The combination enables scans and images to be captured, fully registered together, refined, controlled and exported to a variety of established data format for Trimble and non-Trimble software suites.

Building Design and Construction

For users in building design and construction, the X7 provides answers to the complex measurement problems of existing conditions and improves field productivity for a broad range of applications in architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry projects, including concrete; mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP); and general contracting; as well as quality assurance validation in steel prefabrication.

The X7 solution is fully integrated with Trimble Field Link software to provide streamlined workflows specific to the building construction industry - from scanning to modelling to field layout. The solution also includes a first-of-its-kind laser pointer using scan data to improve communication between stakeholders and reduce rework.

Forensics

For law enforcement, tragic events can happen anywhere and anytime. The X7, developed with feedback from law enforcement, can perform in demanding conditions such as cold and rain, day or night. Ease of use from field setup to automatic registrations ensures that investigators remain focused on gathering the evidence and building solid cases. The X7, supported by Trimble Forensics Capture software, is a complete solution for Forensics investigators.

The Trimble X7 is expected to be available in the first quarter of 2020. Contact AllTerra today for more information.

Quick fix to monitoring conundrum saves time and money

Trimble technology has provided the solution to a monitoring need that would otherwise have required two manned locations operating 24/7.

Required for just two months on a major Brisbane road project, the monitoring was needed to report on deformation in a sensitive work area during foundation works.  On top of that, the work zone was a busy one with machinery and workers operating in it around the clock.

At just 150m long and under 20m wide, the tight site needed two separate vantage points for 40 monitoring prisms.  The two total stations deployed were able to give overlapping coverage as well as minimising obstructions on the site.

The system was deployed and live within days of the client’s decision to proceed with the hire, which meant significant delays and associated costs were avoided.

Solar kits to power the system were installed on Kelly blocks on the edge of site so traffic flow was not affected.

The use of Trimble 4D control, Trimble S9s and the Settop M1s that made up the solution to this monitoring problem meant there was no need for manned survey locations, which would have been required around the clock – another cost saving.  The automated system also worked faster than any manned station could as turnaround for data processing and reporting is in real time.

“We collected data at a resolution not possible with traditional methods,” UPG’s Brent Dawson said.  “Through the use of automated alarming we had the ability to be ready to stop works if deformation was occurring and also had a streamlined daily report that was available for quick review all in once place.”

AllTerra and UPG have the solutions and expertise you need whatever the task. Talk to us today about how we can help you.

W: www.monitoringsolutions.com.au

Trimble and UPG help maritime operation get the very best from its investment

South Australia based marine contractor Maritime Constructions has used its long relationship with UPG (Ultimate Positioning Group) to get the absolute best out of a new dredge on a recent capital dredging project.

Maritime Constructions (MC) is a family owned company and has been a client of UPG since the late 1990s.  In fact, UPG’s marine and dredging specialist Dene Oehme, was the Maritime Constructions surveyor for eight years and since joining UPG, he’s helped MC with various positioning solutions.   In June, 2018 they approached Dene with a challenge: They had won a big capital works dredging contract and had ordered a new dredge for the job. They wanted Dene to source and commission the ‘latest and best’ in dredge management and navigation from Trimble.

The cutter suction dredge is a Damen CSD500 from The Netherlands.  By default, these machines come with a navigation system included but MC considered and rejected this option.  Instead they specifically wanted to go with Trimble due to the local support they knew they would get from UPG Adelaide.

“I discussed requirements with the project manager, Sikko Krol (formerly with Boskalis Dredging from The Netherlands) and we settled on a system that was so new in the Trimble product line-up that at the time, there hadn’t been another such system installed on any Australian dredge,” Dene said.

The system consists of:

On the Dredge:
Trimble Marine Construction software
Trimble MPS865 GNSS
Trimble Cutter Suction Dredge, CAN based sensor kit
Positel linear sensor for “spud” position data

RTK Base Station:
Trimble SPS855 with all GNSS constellations enabled
Trimble TDL450h base radio
Trimble Zephyr 3 Base antenna

For Surveying:
Trimble TSC7
Trimble SPS986 GNSS rover
Sonarmite BTX single beam Hydrographic Survey system.

The project involved the removal of nearly 1 million cubic metres of material from tidal Beedon Creek at Onslow, Western Australia, and dredging of the sea-floor leading into the creek to create a 50m-wide shipping channel.  This established a deep-water port which will operate as a marine support base for local fishing, mining and tourism.

Once the dredge was delivered to Australia, Dene met the crew on-site to install, commission and calibrate the Trimble Dredge Management System.

“I trained the dredge crew in its operation and their new surveyor on basic Hydrographic Surveying techniques as they apply to dredge support,” he said.

“Having worked in that role at Maritime Constructions for eight years myself, I knew exactly what they expected and this allowed me to give specific instruction to their surveyor on the ‘MC way’ of doing things and what they would expect of him.

“I had planned to return to the site after a few weeks to fix any problems and fine tune the system.  I contacted Sikko several times soon after works commenced to ask when he would like me to visit but each time I wasn’t needed.  The whole system was working perfectly and performing as required and expected from day one.

“The on-site training gave the crews the knowledge to do their system checks and calibrations when required and to extract the daily log and volume data to satisfy the clients reporting requirements.”

“It’s also worth mentioning that environmental management, close consultation with community and stakeholders plus the flexibility to modify the project on the run to meet desired outcomes are all vital factors in modern dredging,” Dene said.

“This project was no different and it is a credit to Sikko and the wider Maritime Constructions management team that these concerns have been met efficiently and thoroughly to the benefit of all involved.  Part of that was having absolute confidence in the position of the cutter head at all times and the Trimble Dredge Management System, based around the Trimble Marine Construction software, provides this certainty.”

Based on the success of this system and the project outcomes overall, Maritime Constructions have begun planning further enhancements to their fleet’s capabilities with Trimble technology.  The company has five dredges, three large ‘dumb’ barges and several other large work boats and landing barges.

“UPG Adelaide looks forward to being involved as these developments arise and take pride in the gains in efficiency and accuracy we have been able to provide Maritime Constructions to date,” Dene said.

Project protecting unique environment turns to Trimble

A world-first ecological project team has employed Trimble technology as part of a push to rid an island environment of rodents. 

Located about 600km east of the NSW coast, Lord Howe Island’s isolation and its varied landscape are home to many unique and endemic species. 

This includes 241 species of indigenous plants, almost 50% of which are found nowhere else in the world; 207 species of bird, including the endangered Lord Howe Island Woodhen; and 1,600 terrestrial insect species, including the world’s rarest insect, the Lord Howe Island phasmid. 

The presence of exotic rodents on islands is one of the greatest causes of species extinction in the world. 

Rats have already been implicated in the extinction of five endemic bird species, at least 13 species of endemic invertebrates, and two plant species on the island. 

Rodents are also a recognised threat to at least 13 other bird species, two reptiles, 51 plant species, 12 vegetation communities and seven species of threatened invertebrates on the island. 

Trimble GNSS technology was used during the implementation of a rodent baiting program which was part of the LHIB’s Protecting Paradise Program, an island-wide, holistic ecological restoration program. 

The simple requirement was to find the best GNSS available that could integrate with LHIB’s field mapping software to lay out bait stations in a precise 10m x 10m grid across specific areas on the island, mainly in habituated areas. 

As well, GNSS was required for hand spreading baits in buffer zones between settled areas of the island and mountainous areas, which had been aerial baited. 

A number of GNSS options were trialled and with the tree and other foliage canopy being substantial in much of the target area, many of the trialled GNSS weren’t up to the task, in particular in relaying data to the phones being used for data capture. 

The best equipped tool was the Trimble R10. 

Twenty R10 rovers, receiving corrections broadcasted from an R10 base station and TDL450 repeater were the backbone of the solution. 

Android deviceswere used as handheld controllers with TrimbleGNSS Statussoftware installed. 

GNSS Statuswas using the R10 rover as its location source and the Android devicesMock Locationswas set to GNSS Status. 

This setup effectively provided the Android devices running the LHIB’s mapping software with RTK precision. 

A simple stake out to the grid points to lay the baits in the correct location was field workflow. 

Grant Harper, from Biodiversity Restoration Specialists, said for such a complex and large operation, accuracy and dependability was essential. 

“This is the largest eradication program of its kind ever undertaken anywhere in the world,” he said. 

“We needed to lay out around 19,000 bait stations plus about 6,000 hand broadcast points. 

“We did a lot of trialling of equipment for this project and the Trimble gear stood out, particularly for its accuracy. 

“It is a very complex site as it includes around 900 buildings of all sizes, so the accuracy was crucial. 

 “As well, the team from UPG was very helpful and quickly understood what we needed to do with the R10 units. 

 “Nothing was too much trouble for them – it was a good experience. 

“We used about 20 R10s and they pulled them from around Australia for us. Most projects would use one or two so to be able to provide that many was brilliant.” 

Grant said that while the program was set to end in early November, it would be 12 months before its success of otherwise was known. 

“We have to wait to see if any breeding happens post baiting,” he said. 

“This kind of project is very binary – we either have or haven’t eradicated the rodents.” 

At its core, the Protecting Paradise Program aims to support the removal of destructive invasive species, namely rodents and noxious weeds, while maintaining protection of threatened species by establishing a sustainable and robust bio security system to prevent the introduction and establishment of invasive species. 

These programs complement significant achievements to date including the eradication of cats and pigs in the 1980’s, feral goats in 1999, and myrtle rust in 2018, a world-first. 

To learn more about how Trimble technology can take your operations to a new level, contact us today. 

Flexible accuracy adds value to Environmental Services

Real-time positioning improves efficiency in capturing environmental data.

A New Zealand company uses Trimble technology to adapt to varying conditions and requirements.

Overview

In order to effectively manage and mitigate environmental problems,
organisations need accurate information on the location and characteristics of site conditions. For many applications, environmental managers must rely on low-accuracy positioning techniques to collect data for site analyses. A low-cost, high-accuracy approach to GNSS positioning is transforming one
company’s work in solving environmental challenges.

Getting to the bottom of WW1 tunnels

During World War I, 120,000 New Zealanders were sent overseas. Of those, none were more critical to the war effort than the tough miners, quarrymen, and labourers of the New Zealand Engineers Tunnelling Company (NZETC).

The men of the NZTEC were recruited for a specific mission: To create a network of tunnels between a series of abandoned quarries in Arras, France. The result would be a 2.3km-long subterranean passage through which allied soldiers could move safely during a planned assault.

The work played a crucial role in the subsequent battle. But their efforts have been largely forgotten. So when researchers Pascal Sirguey and Richard Hemi, from New Zealand’s National School of Surveying at the University of Otago, stumbled onto their story, they vowed to preserve what remained of their countrymen’s work.

Sirguey and Hemi devised a project, LiDARRAS, which would use lidar technology to capture a digital record of the tunnel network, one that they could use to honour the men during the World War I centennial. It was a big task. They would have to survey and scan what remained of the tunnels, and then create 3D models and a virtual environment of the caverns. And it all needed to be completed in just two years.

 

The two scholars had used scanning technology on other projects. So after talking with a scanning expert, they chose the Trimble TX8 3D laser scanner to help with their ambitious goals.

From the beginning, Siguey and Hemi envisioned LiDARRAS as a bicultural project. They formed a team of five students from universities in New Zealand and France.

The LiDARRAS Solution

The WWI-era tunnels in Arras, France are awe-inspiring. Large enough to accommodate 24,000 men, they contain a light rail system, a hospital, electric lights, kitchens, running water and living quarters. To quickly and accurately capture them, the researchers and their students chose the Trimble TX8 scanner, which enabled them to:

  •     Collect one million points per second
  •     Produce 3D coordinates with millimetre precision
  •     Capture high-density colour photographic data for realistic texturing of a 3D model
  •     Use Trimble RealWorks software to create high-resolution photorealistic models, even in the dim light of the tunnels

Each day, the students would begin scanning in one quarry and progress to the end of another. Thanks to the lightning-fast TX8 scanner and its DSLR camera capabilities, they completed up to 63 scans per day and captured dozens of high-resolution photos to colorise the point clouds.

“The speed of the scanner was phenomenal,” Sirguey said.

Over the course of LiDARRAS, the team completed nearly 1000 scans and collected about 100 billion points, making it one of the larger scanning projects processed in New Zealand. The final point cloud features about 25 billion points.

In addition to the scans, the students captured 9768 photos, which they processed into 814 panoramas. They also surveyed a georeferenced network of 32 control
 marks, including outside and underground marks, using static GNSS and total stations. The team processed its data in Trimble RealWorks software.

Shortly before the project was completed, the students and researchers were invited to attend the remembrance ceremony of the Battle of Arras. There, they shared details of
 their work and unveiled an animation of the underground network. The team also generated a fly-through inside the 3D point cloud, to demonstrate the full extent of the completed survey.

“LiDARRAS went beyond what we ever expected. The data and imagery was excellent, and we had everything documented and turned over to the city of Arras in time for the anniversary. But beyond its technical and historical merits for the general public, the project offered a unique opportunity to preserve a piece of history, Sirguey said.

Following the presentation at the ceremony, a regional agency conducting an inventory of tunnels in northern France approached Sirguey about the work at Arras. The agency asked for assistance in producing a “light” resampled version of the point cloud, as well as a footprint of the area scanned, to be added to its inventory.

“This is precisely the outcome we anticipated,” Sirguey said. “It’s pleasing to see how the project is contributing to other projects already.”

To learn more about the scanning solution click here

GNSS and TSC7 Promotion

 

Spring into summer with our GNSS Rover Promotion. Combine Trimble’s cutting edge GNSS technology with the rugged, ergonomic controller that delivers the power and flexibility of Microsoft® Windows® 10 Pro and Trimble Access™ software on a seven-inch touch screen.

Let a Trimble R10-2 LT or Trimble R2 with the Trimble TSC7 controller be your go to GNSS rover for all your surveying needs. Or go next level and add a Trimble SX10, the only true laser scanning total station for the ultimate surveying package!

For more information email us at info@allterra.co.nz or call AllTerra now on 0800 2558 3772. Promotion ends 15 December 2018

Trimble Catalyst Wins Awards

Catalyst has taken top honors at the 2017 NZ Spatial Excellence Awards, securing the Supreme Excellence Award and the  award for Innovation & Commercialisation. Bringing together innovators from the NZ spatial industries, the awards recognise products or projects that made a significant contribution to the industry through the introduction of a new idea, method, technology, process or application resulting in social, environmental and/or economic benefits.

“Trimble’s innovation, called Catalyst, allows positioning measurements to be more cost-effective and accessible to a much wider audience without compromising accuracy” says Hadyn Smith, NZSEA chair.

“Out of all the entries, this promises to have the most impact.  It stood out for its immense potential for delivering survey accurate measurement solutions using widely available mobile means – its professional and public reach, therefore, cannot be underestimated” commented the award judges.

Trimble Catalyst

With increasing processing power, high resolution graphics and the connectivity to deliver spatial data to their users, smartphones and tablets have become a low cost data collection tool.
With these increased capabilities a broad range of mobile apps have become available, however their use in the spatial industry has been limited by the accuracy of the internal GNSS receiver in the mobile devices, and the relative cost of high accuracy GNSS receivers.  While high accuracy GNSS has been adopted by the members of the spatial industry whose roles are dedicated to measurement, the cost/benefit ratio has been a barrier to the broader use of high accuracy GNSS by casual users of positioning – people who are primarily performing a work task from maintenance and inspection through communication and collaboration who in the course of their work periodically need high accuracy positioning.
In the past, either compromises have been made on accuracy or the need has been serviced by bringing in measurement professionals. This innovation has been the development of an Android based soft GNSS receiver (a GNSS receiver that is purely in software) and low cost multi frequency GNSS antenna allowing smartphones to achieve accuracies of up to a centimeter using a globally available subscription service.
Delivered using a positioning as a service business model the innovation changes the cost/benefit ratio to make the use and availability of high accuracy GNSS now affordable for the casual users where accurate positioning is required to support their primary job/task, opening up the use of high accuracy spatial information to a far more extensive range of users through a growing range of smartphone/tablet based applications.
Visit the Catalyst website for more information.

Software GNSS. Seriously

Yesterday your phone could tell you where you were within a few meters. Today, with Trimble Catalyst, your phone can tell you where you are within just a few centimeters.

Catalyst features a lightweight antenna that plugs directly into your Android phone or tablet’s USB port. Once it’s connected to any Catalyst-ready or third party location-enabled app, you can use measure, locate, and share the things you map with the world. The little blue dot on your phone just got a whole lot smaller and more accurate.

Catalyst features a lightweight antenna that plugs directly into your Android phone or tablet’s USB port. Once it’s connected to any Catalyst-ready or third party location-enabled app, you can use measure, locate, and share the things you map with the world. The little blue dot on your phone just got a whole lot smaller and more accurate.

And, since Catalyst’s revolutionary technology features a software GNSS receiver that delivers high accuracy positioning with an on-demand subscription service, you only pay for it when you need it.

So get ready to get insanely close to your world. Whenever, wherever you want to.

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