Performance and simplicity keys to new X7 3D Laser Scanning System

Trimble’s new X7 will put 3D laser scanning into the hands of professionals regardless of their level of expertise.

Announced at the massive Intergeo expo in Germany, Trimble’s new X7 3D laser scanning system is a game changer across many industries, delivering the ability to quickly and easily capture precise 3D scanning data to produce high-quality deliverables.

Ideal for surveying, construction, industrial and forensic applications, the Trimble X7 3D laser scanner is an integrated solution with specialised field software, featuring:

  • Simple and streamlined workflows to provide automatic registration of point cloud data in the field with Trimble Registration Assist
  • Smart Trimble X-Drive technology to eliminate the need for annual calibration
  • Survey-grade self-levelling to ensure consistent data quality
  • Professional quality and sturdy IP55 rating backed by an industry leading two-year warranty
  • The compact and reliable laser scanner comes with a Microsoft Windows-based Trimble T10 ruggedized tablet for control and project visibility, along with a backpack and lightweight tripod for portability.

“The Trimble X7 delivers high-speed 3D laser scanning with intuitive workflows and unique technologies automating critical steps, which improves efficiency and productivity,” Gregory Lepere, marketing director, optical and imaging for Trimble Geospatial, said.

“The X7 is a useful, everyday tool because it doesn't require scanning expertise to operate.

“It opens the door for more construction, surveying, industrial and forensics professionals to confidently capture and deliver scan data and realize a faster return on investment."

Surveying

For surveyors and geospatial professionals, the X7 provides fast and balanced performance in indoor and outdoor environments and is ideal for industrial survey/tank calibration, civil infrastructure, general surveys, road intersection surveys, utilities, mining and historical documentation and renovation.

The Trimble X7 solution is fully integrated with the new Trimble Perspective software specifically designed for in-field control and complete registration. The combination enables scans and images to be captured, fully registered together, refined, controlled and exported to a variety of established data format for Trimble and non-Trimble software suites.

Building Design and Construction

For users in building design and construction, the X7 provides answers to the complex measurement problems of existing conditions and improves field productivity for a broad range of applications in architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry projects, including concrete; mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP); and general contracting; as well as quality assurance validation in steel prefabrication.

The X7 solution is fully integrated with Trimble Field Link software to provide streamlined workflows specific to the building construction industry - from scanning to modelling to field layout. The solution also includes a first-of-its-kind laser pointer using scan data to improve communication between stakeholders and reduce rework.

Forensics

For law enforcement, tragic events can happen anywhere and anytime. The X7, developed with feedback from law enforcement, can perform in demanding conditions such as cold and rain, day or night. Ease of use from field setup to automatic registrations ensures that investigators remain focused on gathering the evidence and building solid cases. The X7, supported by Trimble Forensics Capture software, is a complete solution for Forensics investigators.

The Trimble X7 is expected to be available in the first quarter of 2020. Contact AllTerra today for more information.

Getting to the bottom of WW1 tunnels

During World War I, 120,000 New Zealanders were sent overseas. Of those, none were more critical to the war effort than the tough miners, quarrymen, and labourers of the New Zealand Engineers Tunnelling Company (NZETC).

The men of the NZTEC were recruited for a specific mission: To create a network of tunnels between a series of abandoned quarries in Arras, France. The result would be a 2.3km-long subterranean passage through which allied soldiers could move safely during a planned assault.

The work played a crucial role in the subsequent battle. But their efforts have been largely forgotten. So when researchers Pascal Sirguey and Richard Hemi, from New Zealand’s National School of Surveying at the University of Otago, stumbled onto their story, they vowed to preserve what remained of their countrymen’s work.

Sirguey and Hemi devised a project, LiDARRAS, which would use lidar technology to capture a digital record of the tunnel network, one that they could use to honour the men during the World War I centennial. It was a big task. They would have to survey and scan what remained of the tunnels, and then create 3D models and a virtual environment of the caverns. And it all needed to be completed in just two years.

 

The two scholars had used scanning technology on other projects. So after talking with a scanning expert, they chose the Trimble TX8 3D laser scanner to help with their ambitious goals.

From the beginning, Siguey and Hemi envisioned LiDARRAS as a bicultural project. They formed a team of five students from universities in New Zealand and France.

The LiDARRAS Solution

The WWI-era tunnels in Arras, France are awe-inspiring. Large enough to accommodate 24,000 men, they contain a light rail system, a hospital, electric lights, kitchens, running water and living quarters. To quickly and accurately capture them, the researchers and their students chose the Trimble TX8 scanner, which enabled them to:

  •     Collect one million points per second
  •     Produce 3D coordinates with millimetre precision
  •     Capture high-density colour photographic data for realistic texturing of a 3D model
  •     Use Trimble RealWorks software to create high-resolution photorealistic models, even in the dim light of the tunnels

Each day, the students would begin scanning in one quarry and progress to the end of another. Thanks to the lightning-fast TX8 scanner and its DSLR camera capabilities, they completed up to 63 scans per day and captured dozens of high-resolution photos to colorise the point clouds.

“The speed of the scanner was phenomenal,” Sirguey said.

Over the course of LiDARRAS, the team completed nearly 1000 scans and collected about 100 billion points, making it one of the larger scanning projects processed in New Zealand. The final point cloud features about 25 billion points.

In addition to the scans, the students captured 9768 photos, which they processed into 814 panoramas. They also surveyed a georeferenced network of 32 control
 marks, including outside and underground marks, using static GNSS and total stations. The team processed its data in Trimble RealWorks software.

Shortly before the project was completed, the students and researchers were invited to attend the remembrance ceremony of the Battle of Arras. There, they shared details of
 their work and unveiled an animation of the underground network. The team also generated a fly-through inside the 3D point cloud, to demonstrate the full extent of the completed survey.

“LiDARRAS went beyond what we ever expected. The data and imagery was excellent, and we had everything documented and turned over to the city of Arras in time for the anniversary. But beyond its technical and historical merits for the general public, the project offered a unique opportunity to preserve a piece of history, Sirguey said.

Following the presentation at the ceremony, a regional agency conducting an inventory of tunnels in northern France approached Sirguey about the work at Arras. The agency asked for assistance in producing a “light” resampled version of the point cloud, as well as a footprint of the area scanned, to be added to its inventory.

“This is precisely the outcome we anticipated,” Sirguey said. “It’s pleasing to see how the project is contributing to other projects already.”

To learn more about the scanning solution click here

See the latest that could be your new best solution

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The INTERGEO geospatial conference in Hamburg last week has seen our partner business Trimble add some exciting new solutions to their offerings.

 

  NEW AND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY

Trimble® SX10
Full total station technology plus a high-precision scanner in one revolutionary machine.

Find out more

  SCANNING SOLUTIONS

Trimble® TX6 Laser Scanner
High-speed 3D laser scanning with value-for-money to deliver essential performance and scan quality.

Find out more.

Trimble® TX8 Laser Scanner
Ultra-high speed 3D laser scanner with no compromise on range and accuracy to deliver unsurpassed performance and versatility.

Find out more.

If you would like more information about any of these products, contact your local AllTerra office or email info@allterra.co.nz.