Quick fix to monitoring conundrum saves time and money

Trimble technology has provided the solution to a monitoring need that would otherwise have required two manned locations operating 24/7.

Required for just two months on a major Brisbane road project, the monitoring was needed to report on deformation in a sensitive work area during foundation works.  On top of that, the work zone was a busy one with machinery and workers operating in it around the clock.

At just 150m long and under 20m wide, the tight site needed two separate vantage points for 40 monitoring prisms.  The two total stations deployed were able to give overlapping coverage as well as minimising obstructions on the site.

The system was deployed and live within days of the client’s decision to proceed with the hire, which meant significant delays and associated costs were avoided.

Solar kits to power the system were installed on Kelly blocks on the edge of site so traffic flow was not affected.

The use of Trimble 4D control, Trimble S9s and the Settop M1s that made up the solution to this monitoring problem meant there was no need for manned survey locations, which would have been required around the clock – another cost saving.  The automated system also worked faster than any manned station could as turnaround for data processing and reporting is in real time.

“We collected data at a resolution not possible with traditional methods,” UPG’s Brent Dawson said.  “Through the use of automated alarming we had the ability to be ready to stop works if deformation was occurring and also had a streamlined daily report that was available for quick review all in once place.”

AllTerra and UPG have the solutions and expertise you need whatever the task. Talk to us today about how we can help you.

W: www.monitoringsolutions.com.au

Satellite data monitoring environmental impacts

As we use the Earth’s resources, we inevitably impact it, in particular resources that are acquired from under the surface, like coal seam gas (GCS). Currently limited evidence is available on the environmental impacts of GCS.1

To gain a clearer understanding of the environmental impacts caused by GCS production, a project is now underway in NSW. It began in March 2016 and will be run for four years to monitor movements of the Earth’s surface. It is being conducted by Geoscience Australia and the NSW Department of Industry’s Division of Resources in the town of Camden.

The project will use a combination of new and historic satellite imagery and GNSS data to measure any ground subsidence. It will also use a network of 20 geodetic monitoring stations to check for indications of increased seismic activity.

These monitoring stations consist of a mounted GNSS receiver and a pair of radar reflectors, which will provide easily detectable reference points in the satellite imagery. The GNSS data will be transmitted in real time and measured monthly to provide an independent dataset of ground movements.

Research results from the Camden environmental monitoring project will be published on the NSW Department of Industry Resources & Energy website.

Read more about the Camden project on the Spacial Source blog, or find out more about the monitoring solutions Trimble offers on our website.

1 The coal seam gas debate, Dr Alex St John, Science, Technology, Environment and Resources